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FERAL CAT SHELTER
How to make a
>>PHOTOS and ILLUSTRATIONS on this site<<

Feral Cat Shelter Construction

Cheap, Easy to Make, and Easy to Handle
  There are many websites with plans and ideas on how to build feral cat shelters. You can check them out to see which ones meet your needs, budget, and level of building expertise.
List of Materials and Tools to Build This  Cat Shelter
Materials:
*Plastic storage bin with locking latch-
-
   
32 1/2 L x 19 3/4 W x 18 5/8"H
*Sandpaper (60 grit)
*Can of spray paint (optional)
*Straw (winter only)
*Diatomaceous earth
powder--food grade (optional)

Tools:
If this is a one time use, you can use cheap ones.  If you will use them again, perhaps on other projects, consider a better tool.
*Drill
*3/8" drill bit
*Hole cutter (optional)
*Aviation Snips (just need right or left cut)

Safety:
*Safety Glasses
*Hearing Protection

*Respiratory Protection--if spray painting
Next>>>
EducationDx
    ©2018
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer
  You can buy your tools or supplies on Amazon, Harbor Freight, Home Depot, Lowes or your favorite store.  If you are only making one shelter,  you can buy a container and perhaps borrow some tools from a friend/neighbor (but you can always build more--and you probably will!)
I just bought 12 at Big Lots store for $12-14 each!
This is the shelter you can make!
The price can vary on these--shop around!
  This article focuses on

how to build a simple and economical cat shelter

.  It won't be the most elaborate cat shelter with all the bells and whistles, but it is one that can last several years and help your ferals survive!  P.S., it is not made out of cardboard--and looks good in your yard!
  Of course, you should place the shelter in a spot where the wind is blocked and other protection is available, e.g., behind a tree or shed, in some bushes, other protection from birds of prey.  Camouflage spray paint is available to help your shelter(s) blend into the surrounding environment.
What color container should I select?
  You can use any color you have available.  I have found that this grey one blends in quite well with many environments, e.g., on your porch, out in the yard, in the wooded areas, behind a bush.  I'll give you the brand and related info later in this article.   Use whatever you have; this one seems to hold up better than some others, but your climate/weather conditions might be different.

   If you happen to have a plastic container around the house, you can try to see if it works.  Some plastic containers that I have tried became brittle after one winter/summer cycle.  One (more costly one) actually disintegrated!

Let's make this cat shelter!

  You can make one any size.  However, I have found (after making about 40 cat shelters out of wood with shingles and plastic containers of various sizes), that this is the optimal size.  Small enough to move around and place on your porch, but large enough to enable a second escape hole to be cut, with enough room so that the cat (or two) isn't in direct wind.
Can I make a smaller one?
  After you gather all of your materials and tools, it should take less than an hour--the first time.  If you are making more than one, the next one will take about 20-25 minutes depending on the tools you are using and your skills.
How Much Time to Make?
Does Rain Water and Snow  accumulate on that flat roof?
  Yes. But if you get the

latching lock container

pictured above, the rain and snow shouldn't "run" into the container.  A gable (^) roof would require additional expense and time to build, and is probably not practical on a plastic container.  The amount of water that may enter the entrance hole is about the same as a shelter with a wooden roof--it's open.   Facing the box away from the most prevalent wind direction helps lessen this.  In any case, the water will evaporate eventually, but the cat(s) like to sit on the roof when dry, and your help is appreciated!

  You would normally just tip the container slightly towards the back (away from the holes) to let any accumulated water off after a rain.  Just brush the accumulated snow off the roof as you would with a gable or wooden roof--when you clear the entrance/exit (so the cat can get food/water.)  You will be drilling drain holes inside in case any water gets blown inside
(see upcoming illustration).
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How to make a
FERAL CAT SHELTER
>>PHOTOS and ILLUSTRATIONS on this site<<
Feral Cat Shelter Construction
Cheap, Easy to Make, and Easy to Handle
  There are many websites with plans and ideas on how to build feral cat shelters. You can check them out to see which ones meet your needs, budget, and level of building expertise.
This is the shelter you can make!
  This article focuses on

how to build a simple and economical cat shelter

.  It won't be the most elaborate cat shelter with all the bells and whistles, but it is one that can last several years and help your ferals survive!  P.S., it is not made out of cardboard--and looks good in your yard!
  Of course, you should place the shelter in a spot where the wind is blocked and other protection is available, e.g., behind a tree or shed, in some bushes, other protection from birds of prey.  Camouflage spray paint is available to help your shelter(s) blend into the surrounding environment.
List of Materials and Tools to Build This  Cat Shelter
Materials:
*Plastic storage bin with locking latch-
-
   
32 1/2 L x 19 3/4 W x 18 5/8"H
*Sandpaper (60 grit)
*Can of spray paint (optional)
*Straw (winter only)
*Diatomaceous earth
powder--food grade (optional)

Tools:
If this is a one time use, you can use cheap ones.  If you will use them again, perhaps on other projects, consider a better tool.
*Drill
*3/8" drill bit
*Hole cutter (optional)
*Aviation Snips (just need right or left cut)

Safety:
*Safety Glasses
*Hearing Protection

*Respiratory Protection--if spray painting
The price can vary on these--shop around!
I just bought 12 at Big Lots store for $12-14 each!
  You can buy your tools or supplies on Amazon, Harbor Freight, Home Depot, Lowes or your favorite store.  If you are only making one shelter,  you can buy a container and perhaps borrow some tools from a friend/neighbor (but you can always build more--and you probably will!)
Can I make a smaller one?
  You can make one any size.  However, I have found (after making about 40 cat shelters out of wood with shingles and plastic containers of various sizes), that this is the optimal size.  Small enough to move around and place on your porch, but large enough to enable a second escape hole to be cut, with enough room so that the cat (or two) isn't in direct wind.
Does Rain Water and Snow  accumulate on that flat roof?
  Yes. But if you get the

latching lock container

pictured above, the rain and snow shouldn't "run" into the container.  A gable (^) roof would require additional expense and time to build, and is probably not practical on a plastic container.  The amount of water that may enter the entrance hole is about the same as a shelter with a wooden roof--it's open.   Facing the box away from the most prevalent wind direction helps lessen this.  In any case, the water will evaporate eventually, but the cat(s) like to sit on the roof when dry, and your help is appreciated!

  You would normally just tip the container slightly towards the back (away from the holes) to let any accumulated water off after a rain.  Just brush the accumulated snow off the roof as you would with a gable or wooden roof--when you clear the entrance/exit (so the cat can get food/water.)  You will be drilling drain holes inside in case any water gets blown inside
(see upcoming illustration).
How Much Time to Make?
  After you gather all of your materials and tools, it should take less than an hour--the first time.  If you are making more than one, the next one will take about 20-25 minutes depending on the tools you are using and your skills.
What color container should I select?
  You can use any color you have available.  I have found that this grey one blends in quite well with many environments, e.g., on your porch, out in the yard, in the wooded areas, behind a bush.  I'll give you the brand and related info later in this article.   Use whatever you have; this one seems to hold up better than some others, but your climate/weather conditions might be different.

   If you happen to have a plastic container around the house, you can try to see if it works.  Some plastic containers that I have tried became brittle after one winter/summer cycle.  One (more costly one) actually disintegrated!
  If you don't like the color, you can paint the container to match your outdoor furniture, shrubbery, concrete or even camouflage it with a couple of special camouflage paints.  I have many of these (camo colored), but I am systematically replacing them with the grey ones as I update and make improvements in my design.  I had several bright red containers and a couple of bright green ones that I sprayed camo brown and camo green.  They look pretty neat!
  If you don't like the color, you can paint the container to match your outdoor furniture, shrubbery, concrete or even camouflage it with a couple of special camouflage paints.  I have many of these (camo colored), but I am systematically replacing them with the grey ones as I update and make improvements in my design.  I had several bright red containers and a couple of bright green ones that I sprayed camo brown and camo green.  They look pretty neat!
  The purpose of this article is to provide many caretakers and potential caretakers of feral cats a quick, relatively cheap and simple way of helping themThe main purpose of this shelter is to block the wind, keep the cat(s) dry and warm as possible.  If you had an endless money supply, you could build an elaborate cat shelter with insulation, and perhaps a heated pad! 
What about insulation?
  Cats like to scratch--and play!  Cats will scratch insulation unless it is protected by a protective layer.  Never use fiberglass insulation in any shelter unless there is no way for the cat to contact or scratch it, roll in, or ingest it. Also, rigid foam board insulation must be protected.

 
The added temperature increase, if any, will be negligible in a container with open entrance/exit holes.  The thick layer of straw (it's insulation!) you place on the floor of the shelter will allow the cat(s) to "burrow in" with their heads covered as they curl up!

Keep the cat's enemies in mind when building and placing a shelter!

(foxes, raccoons, dogs, other cats, some humans .....)
  Feral cat shelters need two entrance/exit holes.  This makes it difficult to "insulate" but helps make it safer for the occupants.  The second (escape) hole can cause problems with cold air penetration, but there are ways of dealing with that, while creating a safer environment for the cat.

  The second hole provides cross ventilation in the warmer months (and when the straw is removed).  A second hole necessitates using a larger container as opposed to a small one.
NO!
YES!
EducationDx
    ©2018

Let's make this cat shelter!

Next>>>
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer
  If you don't like the color, you can paint the container to match your outdoor furniture, shrubbery, concrete or even camouflage it with a couple of special camouflage paints.  I have many of these (camo colored), but I am systematically replacing them with the grey ones as I update and make improvements in my design.  I had several bright red containers and a couple of bright green ones that I sprayed camo brown and camo green.  They look pretty neat!
  Feral cat shelters need two entrance/exit holes.  This makes it difficult to "insulate" but helps make it safer for the occupants.  The second (escape) hole can cause problems with cold air penetration, but there are ways of dealing with that, while creating a safer environment for the cat.

  The second hole provides cross ventilation in the warmer months (and when the straw is removed).  A second hole necessitates using a larger container as opposed to a small one.
NO!

Keep the cat's enemies in mind when building and placing a shelter!

                                   (foxes, raccoons, dogs, other cats, some humans .....)
YES!
  Cats like to scratch--and play!  Cats will scratch insulation unless it is protected by a protective layer.  Never use fiberglass insulation in any shelter unless there is no way for the cat to contact or scratch it, roll in, or ingest it. Also, rigid foam board insulation must be protected.

 
The added temperature increase, if any, will be negligible in a container with open entrance/exit holes.  The thick layer of straw (it's insulation!) you place on the floor of the shelter will allow the cat(s) to "burrow in" with their heads covered as they curl up!
  The purpose of this article is to provide many caretakers and potential caretakers of feral cats a quick, relatively cheap and simple way of helping themThe main purpose of this shelter is to block the wind, keep the cat(s) dry and warm as possible.  If you had an endless money supply, you could build an elaborate cat shelter with insulation, and perhaps a heated pad! 
What about insulation?